Sometimes an oculist and a great photographer do the same thing—they help us to see more clearly. I just returned from my expedition filming polar bears in the Arctic. Paul Nicklen (http://www.facebook.com/paul.nicklen) led us on our journey. He is a photographer and visual storyteller like no other who is changing the way we see our planet’s polar regions. Nicklen is a virtuoso, a wild-at-heart Mozart with a camera whose images (like the one below) invite us to see and experience nature from the tips of our toes to the hairs on the backs of our necks. (PS: Special thanks to the captain and the courageous crew of the Hanse Explorer who sheltered our dreams as we navigated the ice pack.)
—Gregory Colbert

Sometimes an oculist and a great photographer do the same thing—they help us to see more clearly. I just returned from my expedition filming polar bears in the Arctic. Paul Nicklen (http://www.facebook.com/paul.nicklen) led us on our journey. He is a photographer and visual storyteller like no other who is changing the way we see our planet’s polar regions. Nicklen is a virtuoso, a wild-at-heart Mozart with a camera whose images (like the one below) invite us to see and experience nature from the tips of our toes to the hairs on the backs of our necks. (PS: Special thanks to the captain and the courageous crew of the Hanse Explorer who sheltered our dreams as we navigated the ice pack.)

—Gregory Colbert


As you are reading this, I will be on a boat in the Arctic headed away from the elephants and towards the polar bears. This summer, ninety-seven percent of the ice sheet in Greenland suddenly melted. Climate change affects not only polar bears, and it is not only their end of the boat that is leaking. For the sake of loyalty not only to our species, but to all species, we must decide to change our course. We must not forget that animals are as much our guardians as we are theirs.—Gregory Colbert